Contested Identities: Exploring the Cultural, Historical and Political Complexities of the ‘Three Chinas’. Translated into Russian by O. S. Yakushenkova
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Keywords

National Cinema, Three Chinas, Chineseness, Cultural affinity

How to Cite

Li, Q., & Jennings, R. (2019). Contested Identities: Exploring the Cultural, Historical and Political Complexities of the ‘Three Chinas’. Translated into Russian by O. S. Yakushenkova. Galactica Media: Journal of Media Studies, 1(2), 169-200. https://doi.org/10.24411/2658-7734-2019-10018

Abstract

When facing the political, historical and cultural complexities of Mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, problematic issues arise in relation to understanding the sorts of national/cultural identities that might be projected by them. With regard to these three Chinese language cinemas, a traditional national cinema approach focussing predominantly upon nation-state as a source of meaning would provide only a limited understanding of the meanings generated. This article, however, draws on what Benedict Anderson (1991) put forward as the theory of ‘Imagined Communities’ which assumes a large body of people regard themselves as members of a ‘nation’ (and here we interpret this term broadly and beyond understandings of geographical borders and political systems) through a variety of historical legacies, cultural memories and acts of consumption. In this article we hold the assumption that there is a shared cultural meaning (namely ‘Chineseness’) that extends across the three Chinese language cinemas and consider cultural affinity as greater than national and political boundaries.

https://doi.org/10.24411/2658-7734-2019-10018
pdf (Русский)

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